Kneza Damjana Jude 12, pp. 83, Dubrovnik, Tel. 020 32 39 78
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  • Welcome to site of the
    Institute for Marine and Coastal Research

Organized research work in the fields of oceanography and fishery started in Dubrovnik after World War II with the founding of the Fishery Centre in 1946 and with the establishment of the Biological Institute of the Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and Art (JAZU) in 1949. They formed the base for the present scientific research work of the Institute for Marine and Coastal Research of the University of Dubrovnik. The Institute for Marine and Coastal Research is located in St. John's Fortress in the historical centre of Dubrovnik. The activities of the Institute are basic and concern the research of natural features in the Adriatic Sea and its coastline, particularly research into the structure and processes of ecosystems. The Institute also develops other activities, such as: monitoring living marine and land resources, monitoring sea quality, experimental rearing of plant and animal species with the aim of acquiring fundamental knowledge and studying the various stages of natural processes, maintenance and popularization of aquarium, maintenance and popularization of the Botanical Garden on the Lokrum island, formation of scientific and expert collections, as well as the organization of courses and lectures.
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Science & Scientific Staff

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Aquarium

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Botanical Garden on the island of Lokrum

Activities



The activities of the Institute are basic and concern the research of natural features in the Adriatic Sea and its coastline, particularly research into the structure and processes of ecosystems, use and interpretation of scientific information for the benefit of developing and furthering the cooperation of research scientists with similar institutes and scientific groups both nationally and abroad, education and cultural activity, as well as the provision of professional services to interested users. The Institute, in accordance with scientific progress and economic opportunities, also develops other activities, such as: monitoring living marine and land resources, monitoring sea quality, experimental rearing of plant and animal species with the aim of acquiring fundamental knowledge and studying the various stages of natural processes, maintenance and popularization of aquariums, maintenance and popularization of the Botanical Garden on Lokrum, formation of scientific and expert collections, as well as the organization of courses and lectures that reflect on the Institute?s fundamental activities. The Institute has the approval of the Ministry of Environmental Protection, Physical Planning and Construction of the Republic of Croatia for carrying out environmental protection work: elaboration of environmental studies, elaboration of expert studies, and monitoring work. 

History



Organized research work in the fields of oceanography and fishery started in Dubrovnik after World War II with the founding of the Fishery Centre in 1946 and with the establishment of the Biological Institute of the Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and Art (JAZU) in 1949. They formed the base for the present scientific research work of the Institute for Marine and Coastal Research of the University of Dubrovnik. The task of the Fishery Centre was to promote fishery in the deep southern Adriatic waters, whereas the Biological Institute was founded for the study of subterranean organisms in our karst region. In this respect, this region represents one of the most interesting ones in the world. The Fishery Centre was located on the leased manor property owned by Capt. Pitarević, and JAZU was located in the home of Sorkočević-Jordan. Later on, the Fishery Centre was taken over by the "Academic Counseling Centre" in Belgrade and annexed to the Oceanographic Centre of the Split Oceanographic Institute. Plankton research commences with the arrival of Prof. Tomo Gamulin from Rovinj in 1951. The Oceanographic Centre was shut down in 1956. Andrija Štampar, the JAZU president of the time, contracted an agreement with the Municipality of Dubrovnik in order to further the work of the Biological Institute. By this agreement, the Biological Institute abandoned its seat in Lapad and took over Lokrum Island, which it aimed to promote and preserve. This same contract allowed the Biological Institute to also take over two municipal institutions - the Museum of Natural Sciences (founded in 1872) and the Sea Aquarium in St. John's Fortress. On December 28, 1956, the Dubrovnik City Council supported the joining of the Dubrovnik natural science institutions with the JAZU Biological Institute. The first large reconstruction of the aquarium (1958-1959) and the start of a project for the creation of a Botanical Garden (1959), with the aim of introducing acclimatized tropical and sub-tropical plants, as well as the renovation of the natural science exhibition, birds and fish in particular, altogether formed the basis for the growing significance of the research work done by this center in the southern Adriatic. In 1960, JAZU united its institutes in Rovinj, Trstetno and Dubrovnik under the leadership of Prof. Gamulin, with the headquarters in Rovinj. This set-up was abandoned in 1963 when the Rovinj and Trsteno institutes split into separate units. The Biological Institute continued with its scientific activities, particularly in the research of plankton. The Academy provided the financial support needed for scientific research in the Institute, and the research vessel "Baldo Kosić" was purchased. Also, the laboratory for marine research located on the premises of the sea aquarium was renovated. At the same time, the Institute started to strengthen its staff by awarding scholarships for the specialization of its young assistants. The Institute then had strong connections and collaborated with many similar Mediterranean institutes, particularly with the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn in Naples, Italy. In the beginning, the scientific research work of the Institute was based only on plankton research. Later on, the arrival of botanists and work on the botanical garden intensified research on the vascular flora and vegetation of the Dubrovnik region. This was the set-up of the Biological Institute (Hr. Biološki institut) when it joined the Institute of Oceanography and Fishery in Split as the Biological Institute (Hr. Biološki zavod) in 1977. From 1993 until the end of 2005, the scientific centre in Dubrovnik worked under two laboratories: Laboratory of Plankton Ecology, and Laboratory for the Ecology and Rearing of Marine Organisms. These were two of the overall ten laboratories of the Institute of Oceanography and Fishery Split-Dubrovnik. During this period, the Dubrovnik laboratories of the Institute of Oceanography and Fishery achieved excellent scientific results. Even though the number of scientists in the Dubrovnik laboratories accounted for less than one third of the total number of scientists in the entire Institute, they contributed by 40% to the overall scientific production of the Institute. The process of joining the Dubrovnik laboratories of the Institute of Oceanography and Fishery to the University of Dubrovnik commenced with the Rulings passed on November 02, 2005 by the Scientific Council of the Institute of Oceanography and Fishery, and on November 04, 2005 by the Board of Directors. On November 15, 2005, the Senate of the University of Dubrovnik established the Institute for Marine and Coastal Research as part of its organization, and the Institute started to operate on January 01, 2006.

 

Facilities



The Institute for Marine and Coastal Research is located in St. John's Fortress in the historical centre of Dubrovnik. The laboratory area covers 220 m2. The Institute has a laboratory area (60 m2) for chemical analysis and phytoplankton analysis with appropriate equipment, a UV chamber for sterilization, a laboratory area for the preparation of samples for bacterioplankton analysis, a room for the preparation of vessels, chemicals and other items needed for conducting analyses, a room for microscope studies and computers for data analysis. The Institute has tanks for the experimental rearing of marine organisms, a chamber for growing phytoplankton, zooplankton, shells and fish. The Institute's library, alongside its rich collection of books, has been receiving the following scientific journals on a regular basis: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Journal of Plankton Research, Hydrobiologia, Marine Biology, Oceanologica Acta, Limnology and Oceanography, Aquaculture, Acta Adriatica, Acta Botanica Croatica, Natura Croatica, and others. The Institute has resource to a number of data banks ("Jadran" Project), libraries, etc. 

The Institute also has an administrative staff, and a workshop.

  • Projects

Diatoms on Caulerpa taxifolia
Taxonomic composition of benthic diatom assemblages (Bacillariophyceae) from areas affected by invasive macroalgae Caulerpa taxifolia (Wahl). Project's leader: Ana Car, PhD; Financed by Polski Narodowe Centrum Nauki; Duration: 2013 - 2015.
Eurofleets 2: ESAW
Eurofleets 2: ESAW „Evolution and spreading of the Southern Adriatic Waters“. Project's leader: Vedrana Kovačević, Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale, Trieste, Italy. Collaborators: Mirna Batistić, Nenad Jasprica, Iris Dupčić Radić, Rade Garić (2015-2017).
EU/IPA project JASPPer
EU/IPA project JASPPer; Coordinator: Enis Hrustić; Collaborator: Iris Dupčić, expert in chemistry. The project is completed by 30.4.2015.
CoRE project
CoRE project: IPA Cross-border programme - Croatia-Montenegro: “Cross border joint research and awareness raising action in detecting environmental conditions.
Monitoring in the Mali Ston Bay
Monitoring in the Mali Ston Bay (from 2010 - till now): Financed by Durovnik-Neretva County. Project's leader: Valter Kožul; Collaborators: Nenad Jasprica, Davor Lučić, Mirna Batistić, Jakica Njire, Iris Dupčić Radić, Rade Garić.
Project Croatian Science Foundation (HRZZ, 6433)
Project Croatian Science Foundation (HRZZ, 6433): 'Bio-tracing Adriatic water masses (BIOTA)'. Project's leader: Zrinka Ljubešić; Collaborator: Iris Dupčić Radić
Eurooceans Integration Project 2007
Impact of Global Changes on the Dynamic of Carnivorous Gelatinous Plankton in Mediteranean Pelagic Ecosystems N. D. Yahia (Tunisia)- Project Manager
Marine lakes as natural laboratories of evolution
K. Peijnenburg, Dublin (Ireland)- Project Manager
Scientific Project (Scientific Project Manager Prof Dr Adam Benović)
The biological and ecological characteristics of the South Adriatic Sea impact specific quality of the ecosystems in the entire Adriatic because coastal areas of the South Adriatic are entirely surrounded by the deep oligotrophic water that flows from the Ionian Sea along eastern Adriatic coast.
Project Jadran
(Project "Jadran" www.izor.hr/jadran)

AdMedPlan Project


  • Scientists

Nenad Antolović, PhD

Associate Research Scientist, Assistant Professor
nenad.antolovic@unidu.hr

Mirna Batistić, PhD

Associate Research Scientist
mirna.batistic@unidu.hr

Svjetlana Bobanović-Ćolić, PhD

Research Assistant
svjetlana.bobanovic-colic@unidu.hr

Jakša Bolotin, PhD

Associate Research Scientist
jaksabolotin@yahoo.com

Igor Brautović, PhD

Senior Research Assistant
igor.brautovic@unidu.hr

Ana Car, PhD

Senior Research Assistant
ana.car@unidu.hr

Katija Dolina, PhD

Collection Curator
katija.dolina@unidu.hr

Iris Dupčić Radić, PhD

Senior Research Assistant
iris@unidu.hr

Barbara Gangai Zovko, PhD

Senior Research Assistant
barbara.gangai@unidu.hr

Rade Garić, PhD

Research Scientist
rade.garic@unidu.hr

Nikša Glavić, PhD

Research Scientist
niksa.glavic@unidu.hr

Marijana Hure, PhD

Research Scientist
marijana.hure@unidu.hr

Nenad Jasprica, PhD

Senior Research Scientist, Professor of Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb
nenad.jasprica@unidu.hr

Valter Kožul, PhD

Senior Research Scientist
valter.kozul@unidu.hr

Davor Lučić, PhD

Senior Research Scientist, Professor
davor.lucic@unidu.hr

Jakica Njire, PhD

Research Scientist
jakica.njire@unidu.hr

Vladimir Onofri, PhD

Associate Research Scientist
vladimir.onofri@unidu.hr

Ivona Onofri, PhD

Senior Research Assistant
ivona.onofri@unidu.hr

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Bartulović, V., Matić-Skoko, S., Lučić, D., Conides, A., Jasprica, N., Joksimović, A., Dulčić, J., Glamuzina, B., 2009. Recruitment and feeding of juvenile leaping grey mullet, Liza saliens (Risso, 1810) in the Neretva River estuary (south-eastern Adriatic, Croatia). Acta Adriatica 50, 195-207. [PDF]


 

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2013

Batistić, M., Lučić, D., Carić, M., Garić, R., Licandro, P., Jasprica, N., 2013. Did the alien calycophoran Muggiaea atlantica outcompete its native congeneric M. kochi in the marine lakes of Mljet Island (Croatia)? Marine Ecology: An Evolutionary Perspective 34 (Suppl. 1), 3-13.

Čalić, M., Carić, M., Kršinić, F., Jasprica, N., Pećarević, M., 2013. Controlling factors of phytoplankton seasonal succession in oligotrophic Mali Ston Bay (south-eastern Adriatic). Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, doi: 10.1007/s10661-013-3118-2






The Research Vessel „Baldo Kosic II"

 

The Institute for Marine and Coastal Research owns research vessel „Baldo Kosic II". The research vessel is our most important means of gathering data on natural resources and the environment. 




Awards

 

Institute for Marine and Coastal Research has been awarded by Ministry of Science, Education and Sports of the Republic of Croatia for scientific excellence in 2008.

A Q U A R I U M

The sea aquarium is situated within the walls of the medieval fortress St. Ivan


dr. sc. Valter Kožul,  Head  
E-mail: valter.kozul@unidu.hr


The sea aquarium is situated within the walls of the medieval fortress St. Ivan (St. John's). After passing through the stupendous atrium, one enters the fascinating world of silence and tranquil atmosphere. Diverse and affluent Adriatic Sea flora and fauna can be discerned in 31 aquarium tanks. Fresh sea water runs continuously into the tanks of 115 m3 volume, which may be, if necessary, exchanged by the system of 4 high-pressure pumps, 200 L pressing power per second and 150 m3 of gravitational tank capacity. In the first out of 3 big tanks, all dug in the stone-paved floor, you will be welcomed by the domesticated grouper. In the next tank, there are elegant amberjacks, never tired of circling around. The loggerhead turtle, the oldest denizen of the Dubrovnik see aquarium, has been situated in the third and the biggest tank since 1953 that was enlarged and deepened with ca 50 m3 of the seawater in 2004. You will meet conger eel, denizen of cracks in the submerged rocks, as well as the abundance of other fish. Entering the following premises there are the tanks built in canon niches to the right, and the line of wall tanks to the left. Visitors can observe interesting world of the fish and invertebrates that are hiding in the surrounding rocks and plants by mimicry, hardly visible to unaccustomed eye. There is the poulp who continuously guards the territory, as well as the logo of the Dubrovnik sea aquarium, the sea horse, swimming slowly or with the "tail" attached to the sea bottom. This is an opportunity to see dentex, gilthead sea bream, seabass, common sea bream, brown wrasse, green wrasse, eel, mullets, dangerous snakelike moray, peaceful scorpion fish, spiny lobsters, and trigger fish up to recently very rare in the Adriatic. In the smaller tanks or on the pebble of bigger tanks the visitors can find strangely shaped sea sponges of various colors, sea anemones shaped as blossoming chrysanthemums, corals in the shape of bushes or live rocks, cerianthus and tall spirographis that grow upright like miniature palm trees. There are many other animals like starfish, sea urchins, sea cucumber, conches, shells, crabs, and cray fish. An exceptional curiosity is Bonellia viridis, hiding the body in stone cracks while searching the habitat with the long green feeler. There are floral sea bushes as well, providing the shelter with their long leaves to numerous small fish and invertebrates. Our kind and well instructed staff is at your disposal and assistance all the time, welcoming you in this unique sea aquarium and the beautiful city of Dubrovnik. 

BOTANICAL GARDEN

Located on the island of Lokrum


Katija Dolina, PhD, Collection curator, 
E-mail:katija.dolina@unidu.hr (Cellular Phone +385 20 32 47 28)

LOKRUM ISLAND covers an area of 2 hectares and is situated on the southeastern Adriatic Sea, near the city of Dubrovnik. In 1976, it was declared a natural forest reserve. Lokrum is mostly covered with thick vegetation. Many types of "true" Mediterranean vegetation (Eumediterranean) are found over a small area. According to research, there are around 400 species of vascular flora on the island. The climate is characterized by dry and hot summers, with mild, rainy winters. The annual average temperature is 16°C and precipitation is 1300 mm. There are 2,584 sunny hours per year.

 





The Garden Today


In the public area today (1 ha), there are around 500 species, mostly trees and shrubs, and approximately 200 succulents in the greenhouse. Many introduced plant species, which are not on display to the public, grow on the former experimental fields, which are now under reconstruction, following many years of neglect. Besides research into plant acclimatization, the education of visitors and children, and being a tourist attraction, there is also a possibility of growing local plants that are threatened in the wild. This will help to protect them in their natural habitat. Today, the garden is a part of the Institute for Marine and Coastal Research, University of Dubrovnik. It has one botanist and one part-time gardener. Although the garden is forty years old, it is still far from its final appearance.
In the public area of the botanical garden, plant species are grouped mainly according to the plant family, or, in some cases, according to the same conditions they require (for example: rockery). The map shows the location of the most represented plant families in the botanical garden. 
Probably the most attractive part of the garden is the one with the succulents. Cacti (fam. Cactaceae), puyas (fam. Bromeliaceae) and agaves (fam. Agavaceae) are planted here, mostly of American origin.
Most plant species are labeled. Engraved slates show the scientific (Latin) name of species (besides the Croatian name, if it exists), the origin and name of the plant family. Other specimens of the same species, if there are any, are marked with smaller slates; with the name and number. Palms (fam. Arecaceae) give a tropical view to part of the garden. These are mostly of American origin, represented with the genera Butia, Erythea, Washingtonia, etc. Adult plants are not protected in winter. In summer, they need plenty of watering.
Eucalyptus (fam. Myrtaceae) are evergreen and fast-growing trees common to Australia, New Zealand and Tasmania. Seven hundred species have been described. They consist mostly of trees or shrubs of dry woods, often salt-resistant. In the 1980's, Australian experts estimated that the eucalyptus collection in this botanical garden (around 70 species) was the richest collection of these trees outside the Australian continent.

Location of the most represented plant families in botanical garden.




Garden History


The name of the island indicates that plants from different parts of the world have been grown here since ancient times (Latin: acrumen = sour fruit). The Benedictines planted the first useful gardens on this island in the 11th century. They also started to introduce some decorative species. In the mid-19th century, Maximilian of Habsburg started the paths and planned introduction of plants. The famous botanist Roberto Visiani visited Lokrum at that time and recorded more than 90 introduced genera. The National Academy of Science and Art continued this tradition with the establishment of a Botanical Garden in 1959. The purpose of the garden was to investigate the introduction and adaptation of tropical and sub-tropical plants to our climate, especially those important for forestry, horticulture and pharmaceutical purposes. The plants were obtained from seed on an exchange basis with other botanical gardens around the world. Attention focused mostly on trees and shrubs from similar world climates, such as: central Chile, southern and eastern Australia, central and southern coastal California and the Cape of South Africa. The layout of the garden was made by Dr. Sc. Bruno Šišić, an eminent landscape architect from Dubrovnik. The garden covers an area of 2 ha, near the port called Portoč. Besides the public area and greenhouse, experimental fields and an area with Mediterranean plant species were also established. During the war in 1991/92, the public area was directly struck by fifty projectiles, which damaged many plants and the infrastructure. Most of the library and documentation was destroyed by fire. Restoration of the garden commenced in 1993.
Dr. Sc. Lav Rajevski was born in Izmail (Besarabia) in 1910. Since 1960, he worked as a senior scientist in the Biological Institute in Dubrovnik, with the aim of establishing a botanical garden on Lokrum Island, and researching the flora and vegetation of the southern Adriatic region. He continued his work until the war in the nineties, despite having retired in 1985. It should be mentioned that this garden represents his life's achievement (the result of his long-term enthusiastic work).

  • Location

  • Contact

University of Dubrovnik
Institute for Marine and Coastal Research


Kneza Damjana Jude 12, POBox 83, HR-20000 Dubrovnik, Croatia 
Administration: Nenad Gledić, tajništvo
Tel. +385 20 32 39 78, Fax: +385 20 32 38 72
Nenad Antolović, PhD, Director,
Office: Tel. +385 20 32 31 25
e-mail: nenad.antolovic@unidu.hr







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